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Meditation for World Peace The Meditation Techniques to make World Peace

Meditation began from, Human, animals, things, fortune, rank, praise and power are the things that people try to seek and seize for themselves because they always think that these things will make them happier and better. But many times these things bring the problems and forces back because they have to struggle to possess these things. Sometimes there were some quarrels and angers so much that they fight or have wars. They had to exchange with lives. At last, the real things they got are making the bad retributions, making the feud and revenge. They will compensate the bad retributions in next lives which will make them worse and unhappy both body and mind.
0743a54dee2d9efbf82420109990f92f     What is meditation?
When you are talking about meditation, you have to understand first that meditation is not the matter to the hermit or the ordained ones only. But meditation is the way to train and develop your mind to become more stable, adhere to the goodness and have a better quality of mind. In the Buddhism, the worldly people can meditate to be happier and get better livings and the ordinances can meditate as the way to free own self from all defilements.

However, meditation is universal. It means that not only Buddhist can do, the other religious followers can do too. Meditation is focusing on the own practice because the practitioners will get and understand about the result of meditation by themselves. And if they have any question, they can ask the expert with the accurate questions corresponding to their experience. Although the meditation theories have been described thoroughly, the practitioners may overlook it while they are meditating.
The Meanings of Meditation

Meditation can explain its meaning in many aspects including to the meditation effects and its processing, for example, meditation is calm, comfortable and happy feeling that human can make. In Buddhism, meditation has been appointed to be a regulation for the doers will have a better life, be conscious and intelligent. There is no limit of age or gender for meditation. Everyone can meditate simply.
The meanings in the aspect of meditation effects

Meditation is the indication of mind being in only one emotion continuously or the indication of mind being still, not wandering. The concentrated mind is united to be one, clean and clear enough to see how pure the mind is. The pure mind will cause that person to have a strong willpower, be smart and happy in the same time.1
The meaning in the aspect of processing

In the other hand, meditation in the aspect of processing is the stableness of mind, the stable state of mind in/on to something or the mind standstills to something without wandering.
Meditation cause Inner Peace

In the contradiction, there is one thing that everybody has in this world and it is free of charge and does not require to struggle with anyone. It is the only thing that can lead us to access the real happiness – The happiness from inside by meditation – the meditating until you access the Inner Dhamma . The inner Dhamma exists in everyone’s body. The attainment depends on your intention to practice until you reach it. Whenever you attain the Inner Dhamma, you will be proud and happy by yourself without struggling with anyone and you will be happy enough to share it to the world.
0743a54dee2d9efbf82420109990f92f     The real world peace will be happened, it must start from us. The family, work, social and country livings will be happy and without any conflicts, it must begin with our first minds’ still by Meditation. We can do it by meditation first by your selft and expand our happiness from inside Meditation to outside. Every good thing will be started with our minds. It begins with the first still at the 7th base of mind which we may not hear or know before. But it is the important thing to benefit most in the peace creation in this world.
So, all of us should realize to the importance of the inner peace which is created by meditation because whenever the peace is in everyone’s mind, the world peace creation will not be the difficult thing anymore. There are so many Techniques to Meditate on the world but for DMC we’ll talk about Meditation Techniques in Buddhism.

The Forth Noble Truth: The Path to the Cessation of Suffering

0743a54dee2d9efbf82420109990f92f    The Path to the Cessation of Sufferings: This is the way to get away from all the sufferings. Normally, those who are in suffering can not see the cause of sufferings. Therefore, they usually blame that their suffering derives from supernatural power, or a punishment of God. They try to find the way to get rid of their suffering in the wrong way; some of them arrange some ritual ceremony for the Gods to help them. This is as if one suffer from malaria, instead of trying to cure the decease at its cause, he listens to others who told him that he has such decease because the ghosts or the monsters from the forest has done so and he will be cured only by worshiping or arranging some rituals for those ghosts. This is clearly seen that it’s not the way to cease the suffering at all.

The Lord Buddha is just like a doctor who can clearly see the cause of suffering. He teaches us that we suffer because we have cravings which are the viruses. If we want to be cured, we must get rid of these viruses. He gives us the medicines to cure such decease. This is called ‘the Path’. They are practical methods to lead our mind to a standstill and cease our suffering. They are eight of them which are:

1. Right View:

Having the right opinion about things such as knowing that the parents have gratitude toward us, believing that there are this life and next life etc., able to see the suffering, the origin of suffering, the cessation of the suffering, and the way to get rid of the suffering.

2. Right Intention:

This means having the wholesome intention to remove oneself from the influence of sensual desire, vengefulness, and aggression by being generous, keeping oneself from causing trouble to others.

3. Right Speech:

Avoiding telling lies, divisive speech, harsh speech, and idle chatter, or boasting.

4. Right Action:

This means refraining from killing and cruelty towards living beings, stealing and sexual relations outside marriage, avoiding sexual intercourse.

5. Right Livelihood:

This means refraining from earning one’s living by doing business which is wrong or troublesome to others and to start earning a living in the right and moral way.

6. Right Effort:

Avoiding evils not yet done, breaking of bad habits, development of virtues not yet done and maintenance of virtues already mastered.

7. Right Mindfulness:

This means keeping our mind on wholesome thoughts without any deviation, especially by practicing meditation until attaining one-pointed mind.

8. Right Concentration:

The still mind will lead to the attainment of the higher state of absorption and insight and finally one can eradicate defilements completely.

The Eightfold Path can be expanded into all 84,000 teachings of the Buddha or contracted into the Threefold Training which are:

– Self-discipline: these are Right Speech, Right Action and Right Livelihood.
– Meditation: these are Right Effort, Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration.
– Wisdom: these are Right View and Right Intension.

This Eightfold Path can be practiced at the same time. If one practices all of them, his mind will become clear and is finally able to attain the Four Noble Truths and can get rid of all sorts of suffering. There is no need to pray or ask for help from any Gods or supernatural powers.

Way Meditation for Peace

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Although we realize that our lives will not last a thousand years, sometimes we still let ourselves drift down into the stream of worldly pleasures which causes us suffering. Sometimes we do things that bring later regret. Since everyone is counting the days of their lives. Some people might have asked themselves, “How do we live our lives to the fullest and how do we live every minute of our lives with full consciousness?

A highly respected monk had a clear answer to this. He always reminds the laypeople who come to make merit at his temple that dealing with life situations is something for which we must prepare ourselves.

“Even though we may dislike difficulties and welcome happiness, there is no way to avoid suffering in our lives because life is a mixture of suffering and happiness. Instead, we should prepare for the inevitable suffering with a steady mind.

“Human beings were born with inherent forms of suffering which include aging, sickness and death. Everyday these forms of suffering have adverse effects on our lives to various degrees.

“Instead of realizing and being aware of this suffering. Humans blind themselves even further with other trivial things. A person will trouble himself more to fulfill his desires, for example, to have a spouse and children, expecting that these will bring him happiness.

“Other individuals associated with the person having these desires are burdened with the same inherent sufferings (aging, sickness, and death). Thus, once he marries, instead of being happy, he is burdening himself with the natural sufferings of his loved ones, including the suffering that may be caused by having to be separated from them at the end.

“If you are married or have your own children, there is no need to explain the hardships that will come with your responsibilities. Even by remaining single, having to make a living, taking care of one’s parents, a person barely has enough time left for oneself. After being married, one must play the role of spouse and parent of the children. Each role surely has a tremendous amount of work involved. Thus, everyday, the family life is filled with worry and attachment.

“If you are tactful and articulate, you may be able to find some happiness in a marriage. Yet, one still cannot break free from suffering when death arrives. Being separated from loved ones is inevitable and renders great grief. If one wants to live a happy life, one must learn to be tolerant and to not burden oneself with unnecessary suffering.

“Some people may think that this teaching is based on a pessimistic view. But, in truth, it is a realistic teaching which tells you how to deal with life situations.

“The Lord Buddha was able to conquer all these sufferings. He taught that one can cope with unexpected suffering by mindfully preparing oneself to confront aging, sickness and death, habitually reflecting on the following aspects:

1. Knowing the purpose of life: Knowing that we4 were not born to live only for enjoyment. In fact, we were born to pursue perfections, to cultivate merit in order to break free from the sufferings of the samsara (cycle of life and death) by following in the footsteps of Lord Buddha to reach Nibbana.

2. Self-realization: Habitually reflect on the fact that it is natural for us to die. We have not yet gone beyond dying. We do not know when we are going to die. We must sooner or later be separated from all loved ones and treasured things.

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How can people think about death?

1. Thinking about death with the false view: Thinking that death is inevitable or just waiting for death to come, without cultivating merit or anything good, is a waste of a precious human life.

2. Thinking about death with the right view: Death is unavoidable, therefore, before dying, one must make the most of one’s physical existence by cultivating the maximum number of good deeds in order that the accrued merit resulting from those deeds will be carried on to the next life.

All life ends at death. Yet, death could never be the purpose of life. The purpose of life is to cultivate merit and purify oneself from defilements to attain Nibbana. Since defilements still remain, one should never stop doing good deeds until one’s last day arrives. This is the best recommendation that we have to offer.

Daily reflection on death and the separation from all loved ones and treasured things helps develop consciousness and progress in meditation. A person who performs this reflection will live his life with prudence and preparation. He tends not to seek any extra attachment to animate or inanimate things, focusing instead on performing good deeds. He is unafraid of any hardships. He realizes that death is creeping ever closer, like a shadow that has followed him from birth and is ready to attack him in moments of weakness.

3. Cultivating the utmost merit: The objective of life is to live with purpose or meaning. Doing something that cannot be carried over to the next life is not considered truly beneficial.

The Lord Buddha realized that only the results of our deeds will follow us when we die. He taught, “We are owners of our actions, we are heirs to our kamma, whatever actions we perform, be they good or evil, we will receive their consequences.”

He taught tree principle guidelines on how to live our lives and get the best out of them:

1. Avoid evil deeds: Cast of past bad habits and avoid starting new ones which can increase adverse consequences, to the extent that they will bring us to the unfortunate realms or cause us to miss the path to the heavenly realms and Nibbana.

2. Doing good deeds to the utmost extent: Attempt to perform any good deeds one has never performed and increase the effort devoted to those good deeds that one has already performed in order to gain passage to the heavenly realms and Nibbana while shutting the doorway of hell.

3. Purify the mind: Keep one’s mind bright and clear all the time, while inhaling and exhaling. If a person inhales and does not exhale, that person’s life will come to an end. Death bears no sign of warning. Therefore, everyone should prepare for death by always keeping a clear mind.

The brightness or cloudiness of one’s mind will open the door to heaven or hell for us, respectively.

A bright and clear mind resulting from the recollection of past good deeds will lead you to happiness. The force of good kammic effects based on the good deeds that one has done on earth will open the gateway to a heavenly realm with celestial treasures.

And a cloudy mind resulting from the recollection of past evil deeds will lead a person to the unfortunate realms. The force of bad kammic effects will lead to painful experiences corresponding to that person’s actions in his current existence.
0743a54dee2d9efbf82420109990f92fThese principle guidelines are categorized and elaborated in the Buddhist teaching, the 10 Bases of Meritorious Actions (Punnairiya-vatthu), which are shown below:

1. Generosity (Danamaya)
Merit acquired by giving to the appropriate recipient

2. Moral Discipline (Silamaya)
Observing moral behavior by restraining one’s speech and actions, by not causing turmoil for others

3. Meditation practice (Bhavanamaya
Mental development through meditation

4. Humility (Apacayanamaya)
Reverence and humility towards others with virtue

5. Aiding others (Veyyavaccamaya)
Assisting others without breaking the law, tradition, or morals

6. Transferring merit (Pattidanamaya)
Sharing merit with others

7. Rejoicing in merit (Pattanumodanamaya)
Rejoicing in others’ merit

8. Listening to Dhamma sermons (Dhammassavanamaya)
Listening to doctrines or right teachings

9. Giving Dhamma sermons (Dhammadesanamaya)
Teaching the doctrine or showing truth

10. Forming the Right View (Ditthujukamma)
Strengthening one’s views or forming correct views

“In sum, these ten meritorious actions can be categorized simply into three main groups. They are generosity (Dana), moral discipline (Sila) and meditation practice 9Bhavana).

“A person who understands the purpose of life, habitually contemplates the reality of death, and makes an effort to cultivate good deeds will have the right view of the world.

His mind will be unmoved by worldly sufferings. He will also be able to find happiness both in this life and the next.”

All of these teachings given by a respected senior monk remind us that we should not lead our lives carelessly; we should aim to perform good deeds, and we should avoid bad behavior and purify our minds everyday so that our lives are filled with value.

I hope that this message from a respected senior monk, expressed through this book, aids many in preparing themselves to mindfully handle any forms of suffering that life may bring. The value of a person’s life depends on how one spends it in this world in order to gain passage to Nibbana.

Training Oneself in Non-Recklessness by Practicing Austerity (Dhutanga)

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Life is full of uncertainties and danger awaits those who are reckless with their lives. The Lord Buddha once said, “A reckless person is like a dead person.” Practicing austerity is one of the ways to train oneself to become more careful,Many may not be aware that throughout the 45 years of the Lord Buddha’s propagation of the Dhamma, he gave a total of 84,000 teachings. All of them can be concluded in one word, non-recklessness. This word was in His final sermon to His disciples before entering Nibbana:

“Bhikkhus, my duties that are of benefit and support to you are now complete. In now wish to remind you that the nature of all living creatures in impermanence and degeneration. Thus, you should continue performing your duties with non-recklessness.”

When we possess care fullness, we can easily train ourselves to be righteous and virtuous. When we are reckless, the chances for misconduct through physical, verbal, and mental means will be high. Consequently, our own virtues will automatically decline.

A careful person must train himself to be mindful all the time. As human beings, we have a limited lifespan. We should make the most out of it by didigently accruing wholesome deeds. To train ourselves to be careful is to train ourselves to be constantly immersed in merit. Readers may ask, why?

In Buddhism, each individual performs both good and bad actions throughout his life. However, the manifestation of his kammic fruit will be a function of his state of mind. For example, if his state of mind is filled with evil (he thinks and acts maliciously), his present evil actions will open the doorway for his evil kammic fruit from the past, such as killing animals, to augment his present evil actions and run their course together. Consequently, he will have a short lifespan in this lifetime becauser, he will encounter unexpected misery and perhaps miss chances to accrue merit through performing good deeds.

On the contrary, if his state of mind is immersed in merit (he is kind toward others or thinks of his generosity, observance of precepts, and meditation), his present good actions will open the doorway for his good kammic fruit from the past, such as generosity, to work in tandem with the kammic fruit from his present actions, As a result, he is wealthier in this lifetime.

The Lord Buddha understood the truth about the arising of merit, which can be further broken down into three periods according to the state of mind: before, during, and agter the generous act. Before the generous act, one can accrue merit by habing a state of mind that is joyful; after the generous act, one should recall the generous act on a frequent basis. One can accrue merit through generosity, precepts observance, and meditation practice.
0743a54dee2d9efbf82420109990f92f  According to our ancestors, one of the ways to achieve a state of mind that is full of merit is to practice austerity for three to seven days. Which includes practicing generosity.

Observing the eight precepts, and meditation. Those who wish to practice must stay at a temple. Accommodations can depend on the geographical conditions where the temples are located and their ability to provide for their students. Dwellings can be in an indoor or outdoor environment, such as a small individual room, a house, or even a long-handed umbrella as an open-air shelter placed in a field for each individual.

Some may have doubts that austere practices can help shapeee their minds to be immersed in merit or to possess carefulness as their habit. The answer is explained by the same respected senior monk from the previous chapters.

He said to his students who came to practice austerity at his temple:

“Practicing austerity by dwelling in a long-handed umbrella in the field is to follow an example of the monk’s discipline of the monk’s discipline. The Lord Buddha hade given rules for practicing austerity because of the two following major points:

1) People in this world have the same feelings.

For instance, although some are very happy now, they still fell like other people possess much more happiness than they. On the contrary, when they are unhappy even a bit, they feel like thelr unhappiness is much more than any others’ in the world.

2)People cannot differentiate between need and want.

“It we notice, problems, whether serious or not, that occur in our everyday lives have an enormous impact world’s community because people do not differentiate between need and want.

“Literally, need means a lack of something required or necessary; for example, the four basic human needs: food, shelter, clothing, and medicine. These necessities are required in our daily lives.

“Want means the desire to have, the wish to have. Beyond the basic human need, it is about the comforts in life that people long for. Commonly, when a person desires something, he thinks that he must have it because it is essential to him.

“A clearer example is when a person already has much clothing packed in his closet; somehow, he thinks he wants to buy more that are in fashion. This points out that he only wants it rather than needs it.

“Another noticeable example is that much merchandise is promoted to shoppers as free gifts. Some buy such merchandise because of the free gift. Eventually, they have collected all sorts of unnecessary items left strewn throughout the house. Because of overspending, the end result is they do not have enough money to care for their family and complain that their revenue and expenses are imbalanced.

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​​ In order to differentiate between need and want, our ancestors trained themselves by practicing austerity on every Buddhist Holy Day. Many teaching monks say that if a person wants to experience such a practice, you can go to a temple and dwell under a long-handed umbrella for a few nights. Then you will clearly understand what you really need or want in your life. With little space under the long-handed umbrella (with the cloth-net), you bring only what you really need rather than you will clearly understand what you really need or want in your life. With little space under the long-handed umbrella (with the cloth-net),you bring only what you really need rather than what you want. In addition, if you put more things in it, this little space will be overloaded, and you will not be able to sleep well under the umbrella.”

“Next, the requirement of wearing only white clothes while practicing austerity is to bring about consciousness and heedfulness. Dressed in white, you have to be careful when walking, eating, or even sleeping because it spots easily; and in the meantime, your consciousness develops. Eventually, you will be able to restrain yourself from the habit of a want.

“To bring about carefulness in one’s life, it must beging with the three major principles in Buddhism: to avoid bad deeds, to do good deeds, and to purify the mind. If one can completely pursue them, passage to Nibbana is open to him,

“Even if he has practiced them to his fullest in this life but is still unable to achieve it, he must still go on. Finally, there will be a day, a year, or some future lifetime when he embodies all Ten Perfections and attain Arahantaship (the perfected one), following the Lord Buddha to Banana.”

Based on the teachings of the respected senior monk, it can be concluded that when one practices austerity for at least three to seven days, one can train oneself to be heedful and to immerse the mind in merit. In addition to an escape from chaos, such a practice can provide a peaceful environment both physically and mentally. And in doing so, one can accrue merits in the religions world. Even when returning to the secular world, one will work with a refreshed, joyful, and virtuous mind. A person will perform his job with conscientiousness and carefulness. Problems that arise can be handled thoroughly. He will see the difference and the benefit from each time he practices austerity. Finally, problems that he had in his life will end and be replaced with ore prosperity because of his clear and powerful mind that is immersed in merit.

let’s imagine that if the 60 million people of the Buddhist population in Thailand were to train themselve3s to be heedful by practicing austerity at the same time, problems in our country would diminish in just one night. Consequently, everyone’s state of mind would become clearer. If every temple across the country were to regularly offer programs for austerity practice to the people, Thailand’s problems would come to an end. When people practice austerity at the temple, we can be sure that they will also take this practice home. Then it will become a habit to meditate at home everyday. In the end there will be no more problems in their lives.

This is the way of life that our Thai ancestors inherited long ago. However, how their heritages will be revived and supported depends on one major truth: we must be the first one (exemplar) who practices them. Later, we can invite others to join us.

Considering this matter of value, I would like to invite you and your family to practice austerity at and Buddhist centers or temples located in your community. May I rejoice in you r merit in advance.

The Enlightenment of the Buddha’s First Disciple

a7Furthermore, a large number of Brahmas were able to attain the fruit of “stream-entry” at the moment the Buddha completed his teaching of the Dhamacakkapavattana Sutta. This goes further to show the superiority of the Buddha’s attainment over the teaching of other contemporary traditions the Buddha’s teaching was benefitted from by Brahmas in the Brahma world who normally were considered the zenith of attainment by adherents of contemporary traditions. It follows therefore that Brahmas themselves have not attainmed a level of Sainthood and are ignorant of the Path and Fruit of Sainthood [ariyamagga-ariyaphala]-because when they die from their existence in the Brahma world, they must still continue to be caught up endlessly in the Cycle of Existence [samsara] – just like the rest of the unattained worldlings. The only alternative is to remove all the defilements fromtheir minds and to attain liberation.

The conclusion we can draw from seeing Kondanna at tain stream-entry after a relatively short teaching (and also fromseeing the rebirth of beings in heaven or the Brahma world) is that favouralble attainment comes as a result of wholesome deeds accumulated all the way from one’s distant past, possibly from previous lifetimes and in combination with the good deeds performed in one’s present lifetime. One may have accrued many good deeds in one’s past, however, if one hadn’t had the opportunity to come into contact with the Lord Buddha, or at least his undistorted teachings, then again, it would be impossible to attain the stages of liberation or Sainthood.

It is thus the immense fortune of anyone who comes into contact with Buddhism in the course of their life, to have the opportunity to study and practice Buddhism until reaching a true understanding of it, to dedicate one’s life and efforts to unwavering practice in the Lord Buddha’s footsteps – at least to the point where confidence is gained that one is on the right track ultimately the speed with which one can attain one’s final goal is influenced by many factors.

Supposing you were to plant a fruit tree it is difficult to predict when you will be able to obtain fruit from the tree. All we can say is that if the tree is in good soil and is well maintained with water and fertilizer, undisturbed by weeds it will give fruit more quickly than if all these factors are neglected. Neglect of the tree will slow its production of fruit or even kill the tree before it has the chance to bear fruit. In the same way, the best we can do for our progress is to make sure that we optimize the conditions of life and mind we set for ourselves.

It is interesting to consider that although the Buddha taught the same sermon to all five monks in the Pancavaggiya, it was only kondanna who attained stream-entry as a result. The reason for the difference in attainment is due to the difference in the accumulated Perfections of the monks in the group. Study of Kondanna’s past reveals that during the dispensation of Vipassi Buddha, he was born as a rice-farmer named “Mahakala”:

In the crop cycle, Mahakala would find the opportunity to make an offering to Vipassi Buddha and his community no less than nine times!

1. when the tips of the rice shoots could be ground into milk;
2. when the rice had grown into seedlings
3. at the first harvest;
4. when the rice was bound into handfuls;
5. when the rice was transported to the yard;
6. when the rice was transported to the yard;
7. when the rice was arranged in stooks;
8. when the rice was threshed;
9. when the rice was stored in silos;

Everytime Nahakala made an offering, he would make the wish that he might forever be the first to attain the Path and Fruit of Nirvana during the dispensation of the next Buddha to come. Whenever there was the opportunity to perform a wholesome act, Kondanna would always make sure that he was the first ot do it, and cultivated Perfections in this way until it became engrained in his being. He would do everything in earnest and with dedication –never with reluctance.

The Perfections which he had built up for himself from the past, together with the good deeds of his present lifetime added up to a level of Perfections superior to those of his contemporary monks.
a10Consequently, hearing the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta, Kondanna was awakened before his contemporaries he was to attain sainthood before his other four colleagues. The other four members of the pancavaggiya were not disappointed as a result of their lesser attainment – on the contrary they were all inspired to faith in the Buddha and became dedicated to practice further in earnest, according to the Lord Buddha’s teaching. Indeed, we find in the scripture of the Anattalakkhana Sutta that the remainder of the Pancavaggiya together with Kondanna were to attain Arahantship the first disciples of the Buddha to attain Arahantship.

It is the author’s dearest wish that having read this edition of The Buddha’s First Teaching, readers will be inspired to see that through practice, ordinary men can attain extraordinary stages of liberation and sainthood. Knowing that by practice alone progress can be attained, one should not let the time pass fruitlessly-but get down to earnest meditation practice such as that outlined at the end of this book. Apart from purifying the mind of the practitioner, meditation serves to bring happiness in one’s everyday life, facilitates the overocoming of life challenges, enhances mindfulness and wisdom and in itself is a way of pursuing the Perfections towards Nirvana. Even if we are unable to attain Nivana in this present lifetime, we will be able to secure heaven or the Brahma world as our afterlife destination according to the merit we have accumulated for ourselves.

Whenever the Buddha arises in the world and our Perfections are sufficiently developed, we too may be the first disciple to attain Sainthood in that Buddha’s dispensation, in the same way as Kondanna. Failing this, if we take rebirth in heaven or the Brahma world, we may, like the eighteen crore Brahmas of the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta, attain Sainthood along with the first disciple.

The Middle Way of Vipassana

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The Middle Way of Vipassana is a path of practice that avoids the extremes of either sensual indulgence tice that avoids the extremes of either sensual indulgence or self –mortification. It is a path of practice that is conducive to taming the mind, supreme knowledge, virtuous knowledge, the extinguishing of craving and for liberation from defilements. It is the practice of the Noble Ones, fitting for monks who have gone to the trouble to raise themselves from the status of householders. Monks should practice the Middle Way according to the Noble Eightfold Path [atthangikamagga], namely:

1. Right View [Samama Ditthi]
2. Right Intention [Samma Sankappa]
3. Right Speech [Samma Vaca]
4. Right Action [Samma Kammanta]
5. Right Livelihood [Samma Ajiva]
6. Right Effort [Samma Vayama]
7. Right Mindfulness [Sammma Sati]
8. Right Concentration [Samma Samadhi]

Sometimes the Noble Eightfold Path is summarized in three components, i.e. the Higher Training in Self-Discipline [adhisilasikkha]; the Higher Training of the Mind [adhicittasikkha]; and the Higher Training in Wisdom Prince Siddhattha became enlightened as the Lord Buddha, and gained insight into the Four Noble Truths which comprise:

1. The Noble Truth of Suffering [dukkha ariyasacca];
2. The Noble Truth of the Causation of Suffering [dukkhasamudaya ariyasacca];
3. The Noble Truth of the Cessation of Suffering [Dukkhanirodha ariyasacca];
4. The Noble Truth of the Path to the Cessation of Suffering [dukkhanirodhagamini ariyasacca].

Apart from allowing Prince Siddhattha to attain an end of defilements and become the Buddha, the Middle Way also allowed him to attain Nirvana while still alive [saupadisesanibbana] – eradicating all defilements from his mind even before the break up of his own psychophysical constituents or aggregates [khandha]. It also prepared him for the day of his death when he would pass away into permanent Nirvana [anupadisesanibbana] – at the break up of his aggregates and only his body of enlightenment [dhammakaya] remained, the latter would take its place permanently in the sphere of Nirvana [ayatananibbana].

It is for all these reasons that the Lord Buddha dared to compare the Supreme Dhamma of the Noble Eightfold Path to a precious jewel-because it has the potential to lead whoever practices it to the attainment of Nirvana. These conclusions came from the supreme wisdom of the Lord Buddha.

The insight gained by the Lord Buddha into the Four Noble Truths, was gained in three successive cycles of examination. Only then did he dare to announce that he had attained Enlightenment. Thus, three cycles of examination of four Noble Truths gives us a total of twelve components in his examination:

1. Saccanana: This first cycle of examination of the knowledge of the Four Noble Truths established the knowledge of the Truth of their Existence. Thus he was to find out: ‘this is the Noble Truth of Suffering’; ‘this is the Noble Truth of the Origin of Suffering’; this is the Noble Truth of the Cessation of suffering’; ‘this is the Noble Truth of the Way to the Cessation of Suffering’.

2. Kiccanana: This second cycle of the examination of the knowledge of the Four Noble Truths established the knowledge of one’s duty in relation to them. Thus he was able to find out: ‘this is what should be done in relation to the Noble Truth of Suffering’; ‘this is what should be done in relation to the Noble Truth of the Origin of Suffering’; ‘this is what should be done in relation to the Cessation of Suffering’; this si what should be done in relation to the Noble Truth of the Way to the Cessation of Suffering’;

3.Katanana: This third cycle of the examination of the knowledge of the Four Noble Truths established the knowledge of the fulfillment of one’s duty in relation to them. Thus he was able to find out; ‘what needs to be done has been done in relation to the Noble Truth of Suffering’; ‘what needs to be done has been done in relation to the Noble Truth of the Origin of Suffering’; ‘what needs to be done has been done in relation to the Cessation of Suffering’; ‘ what needs to be done has been done in relation to the Noble Truth of the Way to the Cessation of Suffering’.

The attainment of all twelve of the stages of the cycle of examination , are what made the Buddha dare to testify to his Enlightenment for the benefit of the ‘Group of Five’ – Enlightenment that is supreme in the human world, angel world, Mara-world, Brahma-world, animal-world, world of monks, world of Brahmins, world of angels or men-Enlightenment from which there will be no relapse into defilements and no further rebirth.

Frist Disciple: the most seasoned in the Perfections

At the end of the lord Buddha’s sermon, Kondanna, the leader of the ‘Group of Five’, became a Stream-Enterer [sotapana]. He had seen with the eye of (the body of) enlightenment that ‘Whatever is of the nature of arising, has the nature of cessation’ and in his context, he saw that his own aggregates were of such a nature-all of the nature of arising and cessation.

The earth – sprites [bhumadevata] unanimously praised the supremacy of the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta, saying that it was incomparable with anything taught by monks, Brahmins, angels, Maras, gods or anyone in the world. The praises resounded amongst the angels sequentially higher and higher in the various levels of heaven until it reached the Brahma-world. The cosmos quaked and there arose limitless brightness.

The Buddha knew of the attainment of Kondanna and exclaimed ‘Annasi vata bho Kondanno, annasi vata bho kondanna’ (‘Kondanna now you know’) and for this reason Kondanna was henceforth known as ‘Annakondanna’ (Kondanna who knows).

In fact, the ‘group of five’ had already been ordained for a long time, and were already endowed with self-discipline and meditation. However, they still lacked the wisdom to see the path out of suffering. After the Buddha had clarified the harmfulness of the extremes of sensual indulgence and self-mortification, and advocated the following of the Middle Way or Noble Eightfold Path, the ‘group of five’, especially kondanna who was most seasoned in his Perfections was able to become a Stream-Enterer-the first to attain Enlightenment under the dispensation of our Lord Buddha.

Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta: The Sermon

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This last metaphor clearly illustrates how no benefit can be found by indulging in sensual pleasure. All these dangers of indulging in sensual pleasures are the reason why the Buddha taught in the dhammacakkapavattana Sutta that Buddha taught in the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta that those leading the monastic life must avoid the extreme of indulging in sensual pleasure.

Furthermore, in the Mahadukkhakhands Sutta (The Greater Discourse on the Stems of Suffering) (M.i.83ff.), delivered at Savatthi, the Buddha expounds the dangers of sensual indulgence, in detail which exceeds even that of the Dhammacakkapavattana Sutta.

“O! Monks! What is indulgence of the senses? The senses are five, namely: images seen with the eyes, sounds heard with the ears, aromas smelled with eyes, sounds heard with the ears, aromas smelled with the nose, savours tasted with the tongue, physical touch registered by the body. The indulgence of these five senses is of a nature to tempt us to attachment. O! Monks! The pleasures and enjoyment which come from sense contact are what we call the indulgence of the senses.

O! Monks! What are the dangers of sensual indulgence? The people of this world earn their livelihood in many ways: for example, some are farmers, some run businesses, some tend dairy cattle, some are soldiers, some are civil servants, some are elephant trainers, some are horse trainers. No matter which way one earns one’s living, one has to endure hardship. In the winter one has to tolerate the cold while working. In the summer one has to tolerate the warmth while working. Sometimes one has to tolerate the humidity. One’s skin become chapped in the wind and the sun. Sometimes, other biting insects. Sometimes one is threatened by poisonous animals such as snakes. Sometimes one becomes emaciated because one lacks sufficient means of physical support.

O! Monks! Whether one earns one’s livelihood by arts or by sciences, one cannot avoid the hardships imposed by nature. All these are the dangers of sensual indulgence the manifestation of suffering as we meet it in our lives all coming as the result of our wish to indulge the senses. Whenever a person strives to earn a living, to do business, but does not achieve the success he requires, he will be disappointed, laments that he deserved more after all his efforts, that it is not befitting that he should make a loss, be without benefit-but it is all due to in dulgence of the sense pleasures.

Even though a person makes a success of earning his living and becomes wealthy, it is not an end to his suffering because now he must worry about how to protect his wealth from being taken away in taxes, taken away by robbers, damaged by fire, damaged by flooding, taken away by enemies – so his suffering continues.

If it happens that his wealth is taken away in taxes, or stolen by robbers, or damaged by fire or floods, or frittered away by fraudulent enemies then that person will be sorrowful, suffering in body and mind, lamenting his loss with the realization that’ this wealth doesn’t really belong to me, it is out of my hands’. O! Monks! These are the dangers of sensual indulgence suffering that manifests itself as the result of the sense pleasures.

O! Monks! Emperors fight one another, kings fight one another, Brahmin’s fight one another, householders fight one another, mothers fight one another, householders fight one another, mothers fight with their children, children fight with their mothers, fathers fight with their children, children fight with their children, children fight with their mothers, fathers fight with their children, children fight with their father, older siblings fight with younger siblings, big brothers fight with their little sisters, little sisters fight with their big brothers, friends fight one another – and all because of attachment to sense pleasures.

When people (of various social positions) such as emperors, fight amongst themselves, they try to hurt one another with their fists, by shoving, by punching, by stabbing, with weapons – where either of the opponents might lose their life- all these manifestations of fighting are consequences of attachment to sense pleasure.

O! Monks! Futhermore, there are those who take a sword and a shield, or bow and arrow, or a flaming torch, instruments of torture with poisoned tips, wage war on the battleground, shoot at their enemy, throw spears, stab their enemy with swords, leaving victims dead on the battlefield or leaving combatants mortally wounded. O! Monks! The waging of war, the fighting to kill or wound one another, all comes as a consequence of attachment to sense pleasure.

O! Monks! Some warriors go to the trouble to erect defenses of brick and mortar to stop their enemies being able to climb over, they fill their arsenals full of weapons. However, if the enemy should penetrate their defences, they will be killed with guns, arrows, spears or swords or hanged. The attacker attempting to climb the defences might have boiling cow dung poured over their heads, or have their heads chopped of with a sword, or be mortally wounded. O! Monks! All this manifestation of suffering comes as a consequence of attachment to sense pleasure.

O! Monks! Furthermore, there are burglars who go from house to house robbing them, some force their way into a house and threaten or kill the householder, some are highway robbers, some commit adultery with the wives of other men. When any of these criminals are caught by the king, they are punished by whipping, caning etc..O! Monks! All this manifestation of suffering comes as a consequence of attachment to sense pleasure.

O! Monks! When those who commit wrongdoings of body, speech or mind die, the body breaks up but their spirit remains and will be reborn in any of the four unfortunate (hell) realms: the hells, the realm of hungry ghosts[peta], the monstrous [asura] realms or as an animal. O! Monks! All this manifestation of suffering comes as a consequence of attachment to sense pleasure.

O! Monks! To restrain oneself from enjoyment of the sense pleasures, to restrain oneself from enjoyment of the sense pleasures, to avoid attachment to the sense pleasures-both these are refuges from sense pleasures-both these are refuges from sense pleasure [kamanissarana] or in other words ‘Nirvana’.”

It is for this reason that the Lord Buddha should want to start his sermon by instructing the ‘group of five’ that in dulgence of the senses is unsuitable, base, ignoble, without benefit, unsuitable for a Buddhist monk-and should be shunned, not indulged or prized.

What is​Vipassana ?

kbp4Meditation to attain the Dhamma has restrained me from having bad thoughts. When I have bad thoughts, I can clear them out very quickly before I end up feeling sorry about doing bad deeds or saying bad words. I have quit smoking, permanently. My wife and I are more at peace. We care for each other more deeply than before. My name is Richard Braun. I am German and I have been married to a woman for 13 years. In the past, those who visited us could sense the heat in our home despite the very cold weather of Germany. This is because both my wife and myself were very temperamental. We never give in to each other. We usually fight and exchange harsh words. It was like throwing rocks at each other. I do not feel comfortable saying pleasant words such as, “I love my wife”. I do not see the necessity of saying those words. The only time I said, “I love you”, was the day I proposed to her 15 years ago. In addition, In addition, I had been smoking for 37 years.

My life changed when my wife received a Dhamma VCD from the monk at the Hanover Meditation Centre. While she watched the VCD, I could feel the power of Luang Phaw’s voice in that VCD although I Could not understand Thai. It was full of love and kindness. It inspired me to quit smoking for good and also inspired me to try meditation Both my wife and I began meditating in order to attain the Dhammakaya.

Since I don’t understand Thai, I received very little information regarding meditation using the Dhammakaya technique. I was told to place my mind inside my body, two inches above the navel level and allow it to remain there. I could use a clear crystal ball as an object of meditation. That’s all I learned. In the first five days of meditation, I could not see anything except darkness. But I could feel the serenity. On the sixth day, my mind came to a standstill. I first saw a small shining star inside my body. I tried to control my excitement. Later, the star enlarged and the crystal body of the Dhammkaya appeared inside. The Dhammakaya was as bright as the sun, but the sight brought me a cool feeling and it felt comfortable to my eyes. I could feel the happiness that radiated from the centre of my body. It was so great that I could not keep it to myself. My wife was so astonished that a student like me could attain a better experience than her trainer. I think no one can explain the happiness that I received, and nothing in this world can compare.

That experience encouraged me to meditate more. I currently meditate about 2 or 5 hours a day. In the past, it took me some tine to free all the thoughts from my mind. I would have to take a seep breath to do so. If it did not work, I would recite the mantra, “Samma Arahang”. Now, I can let go of all my thoughts as soon as I sit down to meditate and close my eyes. I can see the body of the Dhammakaya inside me when I meditate, or even when I drive a car, or have my meal, or take a bath. Some times, I can see the Shammakaya rising up from the centre of my body, one by one like pearls on a necklace, the new pearl emerging more beautifully than the previous one. The largest Dhammakaya body that I ever saw was as big as the Zugspiter Mountain. It is the tallest mountain in Germany.

The Dhammakaya body was brighter than sunlight and very beautiful. It was a wonderful feeling. My body was so light, it was as if it was going to disappear. My mind was so light and I felt so happy that I cannot explain the feeling I had in words. I have tried meditating before, using many other techniques. But I feel that the Dhammakaya technique is best suited for me. I like the way that I don’t have to do anything more to attain happiness. Presently, my wife and I do the chanting and meditate everyday after work. When I meditate, I listen to Luang Phaw
Dhammajayo’s teachings to comfort and calm my mind. I close my eyes, loosen my mind and clear all my thoughts. Meditation to attain the Dhammakaya has restrained me from having bad thoughts. When I have bad thoughts, I can clear them out very quickly before I end up feeling sorry about doing bad deeds or saying bad words. I have quit smoking, permanently. My wife and are more at peace. We care for each other more deeply than before. O tell her everyday that I love her. I choose my words with care when I talk to her. She says that I am no longer a husband who speaks harshly and I think she is no longer a wife who complains as much. She says that I am filled with love, but I think that is because she is lovely. In the end, we have transformed from being a temperamental couple to being a couple that people want to become acquainted with.

What is Meditation?

hair 20When you are talking about meditation, you have to understand first that meditation is not the matter to the hermit or the ordained ones only. But meditation is the way to train and develop your mind to become more stable, adhere to the goodness and have a better quality of mind. In the Buddhism, the worldly people can meditate to be happier and get better livings and the ordinants can meditate as the way to free own self from all defilements.

However, meditation is universal. It means that not only Buddhist can do, the other religious followers can do too. Meditation is focusing on the own practice because the practitioners will get and understand about the result of meditation by themselves. And if they have any question, they can ask the expert with the accurate questions corresponding to their experience. Although the meditation theories have been described thoroughly, the practitioners may overlook it while they are meditating.
The Meanings of Meditation
Meditation can explain its meaning in many aspects including to the meditation effects and its processing, for example, meditation is calm, comfortable and happy feeling that human can make. In Buddhism, meditation has been appointed to be a regulation for the doers will have a better life, be conscious and intelligent. There is no limit of age or gender for meditation. Everyone can meditate simply.
The meanings in the aspect of meditation effects
Meditation is the indication of mind being in only one emotion continuously or the indication of mind being still, not wandering. The concentrated mind is united to be one, clean and clear enough to see how pure the mind is. The pure mind will cause that person to have a strong willpower, be smart and happy in the same time.1
The meaning in the aspect of processing
In the other hand, meditation in the aspect of processing is the stableness of mind, the stable state of mind in/on to something or the mind standstills to something without wandering.

The meaning in the aspect of the Dhammakaya attainment
The Most Vern. Phrarajbhavanavisudh said about the meaning of meditation in the aspect of practicing that meditation is the way to standstill your mind within your physical body. That is to let your mind to come back into your body in the happy and comfortable mood. It is to let your wandering mind in various emotions or thoughts e.g. family, business, studying problems etc. to come back into your body and have only one emotion – peaceful emotion. The Most Ven. has referred to the Great Master Phramongkolthepmuni’s words that meditation is about how to reunite your seeing–sphere, remembering–sphere, thinking–sphere, and understanding-sphere to be the only one sphere with the peaceful emotion within your body. The way to meditate well enough to attain Dhammakaya is the way of training your mind to be standstill within your body.

40 Ways to Create Peace of Mind The Vipassana

combo1 There was a time when I thought peace was a destination, in much the same way I imagined I’d eventually arrive at happiness or success.
It seemed like something I needed to chase or find—definitely not something I could experience without dramatically changing my life.
I needed to work less, relax more, and generally revamp my circumstances and relationships in order to be a peaceful person.
Despite seeing peace as an endpoint, I also saw it as something passive—after all, that’s why I was so stressed: I had so much to do.
I’ve since realized that peace is always available, and like any desirable state of mind, it requires effort, even if that effort entails consciously choosing to be still.
Sure, our circumstances affect our mental state, but they don’t have to control them, not if we make tiny choices for our well-being.
Admittedly, it’s not easy to choose peace when we’re going through tough times. I still go through periods when I get caught up in worries and stresses, and it can feel like that’s the only available response to things that have happened.
But it’s not. There are countless things we can do to create peace of mind—both in response to events in our lives, and proactively, everyday.
If you’d also like to develop a greater sense of peace, you may find these suggestions helpful:
Meditation
1. Take 5-10 minutes for a simple seated meditation.
2. Take 100 deep breaths, counting “and one,” “and two,” and so on, with “and” on the inhalations and the numbers on the exhalations.
3. Take a meditative walk, focusing solely on the physical sensations of walking—the earth under your feet, the swing of your hips.
4. Find a guided meditation on YouTube and let it lull you into a blissful state of presence.
5. Practice alternate nostril breathing. Hold the left nostril down and inhale through the right; then hold the breath. Release the left nostril, hold the right one down, and exhale through the left. Now start on the left with an inhalation, exhaling on the right. This is one set. Do up to five of them.
Communication
6. Write down everything that’s weighing you down mentally and then burn it as a form of letting go.
7. Write down everything you’ve learned from a difficult experience so you can see it as something useful and empowering instead of something to stress you out.
8. Tell someone how their actions affected you instead of holding it in and building resentment.
9. Call someone you’ve denied forgiveness and tell them you forgive them.
10. Apologize for a mistake instead of rehashing it, and then choose to forgive yourself.
Creativity
11. Engage in a little art therapy; grab some crayons, markers, or paint and put all your feelings on the page.
12. Create a peace collage. Include images that make you feel relaxed and at ease. (Google “peace collage” and you’ll get lots of ideas!)
pngkbp113. Meditate on your favorite peace quote and then write it in calligraphy for framing.
14. Take a walk with the sole intention of photographing beautiful things that make you feel at peace, like a tree with colorful autumn leaves.
15. Write a blog post about what gives you peace of mind. (This has been a calming experience for me!)
Activity
16. Get up and dance to your favorite song, focusing solely on the music and the movement. Get into your body and get out of your head!
17. Take a long walk on the beach, focusing on the feel of the sand between your toes and the sound of the crashing waves. Cliché, but highly effective!
18. Go for a bike ride in a scenic part of town, and immerse yourself in the calm of your environment.
19. Take 5−10 minutes for stretching, syncing your breath with the movements (or if you have an hour, visit a local studio for a yoga class).
20. Declutter a cluttered part of your home, creating a more peaceful space.
Acceptance
21. Muster compassion for someone who hurt you, instead of wallowing in bitterness, which will make it easier to forgive them and set yourself free.
22. Set aside some time to actively enjoy the good things about the present instead of scheming to create a better future.
23. Create a list of things you love about yourself instead of dwelling on how you wish you were different.
24. Focus on what you appreciate about the people in your life instead of wishing they would change (assuming you’re in healthy relationships).
25. Recognize if you’re judging yourself in your head with phrases like “I should have” or “I shouldn’t have.” Replace those thoughts with, “I do the best I can, my best is good enough, and I’m learning and growing every day.”
Solitude
26. Start reading that book you bought about dealing with the challenge you’ve been facing.
27. Schedule a date with yourself—a time when you don’t need to meet anyone else’s requests—and do something that feeds your mind and spirit. Go to a museum or take yourself to your favorite restaurant and simply enjoy your own company.
28. Sit in nature—under a tree, on a mountain—and let yourself simply be.
29. Be your own best friend. Tell yourself what’s on your mind, and then give yourself the advice you’d give a good friend who had the same issue.
30. Repeat some positive affirmations that help you feel present, peaceful, and empowered.
Connection
31. Tell the truth in your relationships. When we hold in our true feelings, we create stress for ourselves. Be kind but honest and share what you really feel.
32. Catch critical, blaming, or self-victimizing thoughts. Instead of ruminating on what someone else did wrong, express yourself and ask yourself what you can do to create the change you’re seeking.
33. Have fun with someone you love. Forget about everything that feels like a problem and do something silly and childlike.
34. Connect with someone online who can relate to what you’re going through and create a mutually supportive relationship by sharing and listening.
35. Let someone into your self-care routine—ask a friend to join a yoga studio with you, or invite your sister to jog with you on the beach.
Contribution
36. Volunteer your time to help a charity you believe in. Put all your energy into helping someone else, and you will inadvertently help yourself.
37. Volunteer at your local animal shelter. Animals are naturally present, and it’s contagious!
38. Do something kind for someone else without expecting anything in return. If they ask what they can do for you, tell them to pay it forward.
39. Leverage your passion to help someone else (i.e.: if you’re an aspiring designer, design a logo for a friend). You get to get in the zone doing something you love; someone else gets support they need. A win/win!
40. Leverage your purpose to serve someone else, not for money—just because. That might mean helping them pursue their passion, or motivating them to reach their fitness goals. Whatever gives your life meaning, give it to someone freely.
As is often the case with these types of list, this can seem a little long and overwhelming. The important thing is that we do at least one tiny thing every day to create mental stillness. What helps you create peace of mind?